Academic Programs 
      

Global Ethics     (ET-630)
Fall 2003

Learning to live together is the challenge of our age. This course explores the resources in and across traditions that can help us confront this challenge. In addition to exploring the work in this area of Hans Küng and the World Council of Churches, this course looks at how these attempts to arrive at a Global Ethic might be applied to predicaments facing humanity in the 21st century.



Meeting Day, Time and Dates:
 
D.Min. Tuesdays, 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 9/16; 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 10/7; 10/28; 11/18; 12/9
Heidi Hadsell
Professor of Social Ethics and President of Hartford Seminary

 

Contact Information:
phone: 
(860) 509-9502
email:  hadsell@hartsem.edu

 

Course Syllabus



This course will focus on the current international debate on the dynamics and effects of globalization.  It will also focus on recent work in the area of global ethics represented by Hans Jung, Jurgen Moltmann, Sallie McFague and Peter Singer.  The course is intended to enable students to think through some of these important moral issues and to help religious leaders think about encouraging their religious communities to become informed and involved in the debate.


September 16             Why Ethics?

How do we “do” ethics and why?
What is the relationship between theology and
Why “global” ethics?

This day will be devoted first to a crash course on how and why we do ethics, and then it will begin an exploration of the reasons why we should do ethics that are global in scope.

Reading
Class handout:  Hadsell, “For the Sake of the Neighbor, For the Sake of the World.”
McFague, Life Abundant, Part 11
Kung, A Global Ethic for Global Politics and Economics, Part B



October 7          Issues in Globalization

This day will be centered on the environmental, economic and political issues that are global in scope that prompt much of the concern for a global ethic and the activism such as that seen in Seattle at the WTO meetings several years ago.

Reading
McFague (see above)
Kung (see above)



October 28 and           The Building Blocks for a Global Ethic
November 18

How do we go about thinking about a global ethic?  What would it look like?  Who would participate in its design?  What are the special challenges such an ethic represents?  What is the nature of the inter-religious challenge in this respect?


Reading
Walzer, Thick and Thin
Kung, Part A, Sections 3, 4, 5
Class handouts on the Earth Charter and on Ecumenical Ethics
Singer, One World


December 9        Global Ethics in the Local Parish

Here we will want to think carefully about bringing global issues and ethic to the local level.  How does one help local religious communities see and understand the global issues in their own midst?  What pedagogical and Biblical resources are available?  Where does one begin?

Reading
McFague, Part 1 and Part 3
Moltmann, God for a Secular Society
Global Responsibility
- Hans Kung (1991)
Life Abundant – Sallie McFague (2001)
One World - Peter Singer (2003)
Thick and Thin - Michael Walzer (1994)
God for a Secular Society - Jurgen Moltmann
The Lexus and the Olive Tree
- Thomas Friedman (Recommended)
God and Globalization, Vols. 1,2,3 - Max Stackhouse et. al. (2000, 2001, 2003) (Recommended)         


Course Bibliography 

  • A Global Ethic for Global Politics and Economics - Hans Kung (1998) 

  • Life Abundant – Sallie McFague (2001)

  • One World - Peter Singer (2003)

  • Thick and Thin - Michael Walzer (1994)

  • God for a Secular Society - Jurgen Moltmann

  • The Lexus and the Olive Tree - Thomas Friedman (Recommended)

  • God and Globalization, Vols. 1,2,3 - Max Stackhouse et. al. (2000, 2001, 2003) (Recommended)

Hartford Seminary  77 Sherman Street  Hartford, CT  06105   860-509-9500  info@hartsem.edu