Academic Programs 
      

Counseling American Muslim Families   (AM-651)
  Fall 2005

This course outlines both the religious and cultural diversity within the Muslim population of the United States.  It examines the challenges American Muslim families face in the United States and how these challenges affect their lives.  Issues related to marriage, marital relationships, communication within the family, conflict resolution techniques, support systems and how to deal with the complex issues of Muslim teenagers growing up in America will be identified. Guidelines on how to counsel Muslim families on these as well as on other issues will be provided. 

 

Meeting Day, Time and Dates: 
This course will meet on a special schedule over three weekends beginning on Saturday evenings from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and continuing on Sundays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the following dates:  9/17-9/18, 10/29-10/30, and 12/10-12/11.  

 

Ahmed Nezar Kobeisy
Adjunct Professor of Arts of Ministry and Counselor and Muslim Chaplain, Syracuse University
 

Contact Information:
phone: 
(860) 509-9500
email:   akobeisy@syr.edu

 

Course Syllabus

 

 

This course outlines both the religious and cultural diversity within the Muslim population of the United States.  It examines the challenges American Muslim families face in the United States and how these challenges affect their lives.  It explores issues related to marriage, marital relationships, domestic abuse, child rearing, communication within the family and conflict resolution techniques. Furthermore, it emphasizes the ways for establishing support systems for Muslim families and for dealing with the complex issues of Muslim teenagers growing up in America.

Finally, it will provide guidelines and practical skills on how to counsel Muslim families on these as well as on other issues.


Required Textbooks:

  1. Kobeisy, A. (2004), Counseling American Muslims: Understanding the Faith and Helping the People. Greenwood/PRAEGER. (Required)
  2. McGoldrick, M, Giordano, J. & Perce, J. (Eds.), (1996), Ethnicity and Family Therapy.  The Guilford Press. (Required).
  3. Richards, P. & Bergin, A. (1999): Handbook of Psychotherapy and Religious Diversity.  The American psychological Association. (Optional).
  4. A Reader or articles on reserve: will be provided at the first class meeting. (required)

Course Requirements:

1.   Regular attendance and active participation.  In addition to physical presence in class during all times of instruction, participation must includes initiating and responding to classroomís discussions. This component is worth 20% of the grade.  Unexcused absences are not allowed. 

2.   Final exam (40% total).

3. One research paper of at least five pages (30%). Before you begin the research and develop a topic, submit a proposal for my approval.

4. A daily journal in which youíll write commentary and analysis on both the readings and your experience in the class (10%).  I expect you to be as analytical and critical as possible. The journals are due every day for the previous day.

 

Extremely Important:

  • All assignments are to be typed or printed and handed in on time. Assignments must include references where appropriate and bibliographies.  It is expected that you will proofread all your work before submitting it.
  • Required readings for the day must be done in advance and prior to the day in which it is listed.
  • Food, cell phones and beepers are prohibited during class.  Essential and needed rinks (e.g. coffee, soda, juice and other non-alcoholic beverages) are allowed provided they do not violate the college or facility rules or interfere with the educational process.


Syllabus:

First week meeting

1.     Introduction and Organization.
2.     Counseling: concept and practice
3.     Religion (Islam) and counseling
4.     Multicultural Counseling: meaning and competencies.
5.     Islam and Muslims: Diversity within Unity
6.     American Muslims: History and demography
7.     Film on Multicultural counseling and counseling techniques

Readings:

  1. Kobeisy: Chapters 1,2 & 4
  2. McGoldrick et al (Eds.): Chapter 1: Overview
  3. Handouts.

Required work for the day:

1.   Commentary and critique of reading and class activities.
2.   Presentation in class about studentís experience and understanding of counseling and Muslims.
3.    Journal entry.

 

Second Meeting

1.         Muslimsí perception of counseling.
2.         Good and bad counseling through Muslimsí eyes.
3.         Issues for the American Muslim families.
4.         Identifying issues and recognizing limitations.
5.         Film on family systems and therapy.

Readings for the day:

1.     Kobeisy: Chapters 3 & 5
2.     McGoldrick et al (Eds.): Chapter 5, 8, 22, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 44 & 46.
3.     Handouts
 

Required work for the day:

1.      Commentary and critique of reading and class activities.
2.      Studentís research and presentation on the family structure and challenges on one or more ethnic groups within the American Muslim community.
3.      Studentsí practice of multicultural competency and intercultural communication skills.
4.      Journals.

 

Third Meeting

1.         Practical counseling to real issues facing American Muslim families.

Readings for the day:

1.         catching up.
2.         Handouts.

Required work for the day:

1.         Practical Skills.
2.         Presentations
3.         Locating resources
4.         Final Exam
5.         Evaluation of the course
6.         Conclusion


Research paper is due.

 

Hartford Seminary  77 Sherman Street  Hartford, CT  06105   860-509-9500  info@hartsem.edu