Academic Programs 
      

  Realities of Chaplaincy in Various Settings   (AM-656)
Winter/Spring 2005

This course will introduce students to differences, commonalities and nuances involved with chaplaincy work in various institutional settings such as hospitals, local, state, and federal prisons, college campuses, long-term care facilities (such as nursing homes and hospices), etc. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the pastoral needs of clients in each setting, how to assess the institutional strengths and limitations in various settings and how to effectively serve in the unique setting each kind of institution presents. 

 

Meeting Day, Time and Dates: 
Monday, January 10-Friday, January 14 from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Ahmed Nezar Kobeisy
Adjunct Professor of Arts of Ministry and Counselor and Muslim Chaplain, Syracuse University

Contact Information:
phone: 
(860) 509-9500
email:  akobeisy@syr.edu

 

Course Syllabus




 

The Course provides an understanding of the historic development, evolution and expansion of chaplaincy in scope and applications.  The different tasks of chaplaincy in various settings (e.g. educational institutions, military, prisons, health care, etc.) will be explored with emphasis placed on the understanding the spiritual needs of clients in each setting. Furthermore, assessing the institutional strengths and limitations in various settings and how to effectively serve in the unique setting each kind of institution presents will be introduced. 

The role of chaplains in serving the needs of populations that are culturally and/ or religiously different will be included in order to enable chaplains to effectively function in multi-faith settings and serve diverse populations.

Required Textbooks:

  1. Opata, J. (2001). Spiritual and Religious Diversity in Prisons: Focusing on how Chaplaincy Assists in Prison Management. Thomas Charles Publisher, Limited.
  2. Cherry, C., Deberg, B. & Porterfield, A. (2003). Religion on Campus. The University of North Carolina Press.
  3. Bowman, G. (1998). Dying, Grieving, Faith and Family. A Pastoral Care Approach. The Haworth Press, Incorporated.
  4. Kirkwood, N. (1999). A Hospital Handbook on Multiculturalism and Religion: Practical Guidelines for Health Care Workers.  Morehouse Publishing.

Other handouts and reading materials will be distributed and/or assigned.

Course Requirements:

1.   Regular attendance and active participation.  In addition to physical presence in class during all times of instruction, participation must include initiating and responding to classroom’s discussions. This component is worth 20% of the grade.  Unexcused absences are not allowed. 

2.   Final take-home exam (40% total).

3.   One research paper of at least five pages (30%). Before you begin the research and develop a topic, submit a proposal for my approval.

4.   A daily journal in which you’ll write commentary and analysis on both the readings and your experience in the class (10%).  I expect you to be as analytical and critical as possible. The journals are due every day for the previous day.

 

Extremely Important:

  • All assignments are to be typed or printed and handed in on time. Assignments must include references where appropriate and bibliographies.  It is expected that you will proofread all your work before submitting it.
  • Required readings for the day must be done in advance and prior to the day in which it is listed.
  • Food, cell phones and beepers are prohibited during class.  Essential and needed drinks (e.g. coffee, soda, juice and other non-alcoholic beverages) are allowed provided they do not violate the college or facility rules or interfere with the educational process.

 

Syllabus:

Day one (January 10, 2005)

1.     Introduction and Organization.  
2.     Chaplaincy: History, definition, role, scope of services, current trends and future outlook.
3.     Qualifications for the effective chaplain.
4.     Students’ experience.

Day two (January 11, 2005)

  1. Chaplaincy in prison and the Military.
  2. Conflict of loyalties.
  3. Diversity in prison.

Readings for the day:

1.   Opata, J. (2001). Spiritually and Religious Diversity in Prisons: Focusing on how Chaplaincy Assists in Prison Management.

Day three (January 12, 2005) 

1.      Faith in health care.  
2.      Pastoral care\counseling.

Readings for the day:

1.      Bowman, G. (1998). Dying, Grieving, Faith and Family. A Pastoral Care Approach.  
2.      Kirkwood, N. (1999). A Hospital Handbook on Multiculturalism and Religion: Practical Guidelines for Health Care Workers. 

Day Four (January 13, 2005)

1.         Religion on campus.
2.         Cults and cult-like groups.

Readings for the day:

1. Cherry, C., Deberg, B. and Porterfield, A. (2003). Religion on Campus.

Day Five (January 14, 2005)

1.         Catching up
2.         Institutional matters.
3.         Diversity in chaplaincy.
4.         Final Exam
5.         Evaluation of the course
6.         Conclusion.


Guest Speakers:

Guest speakers representing several faith denominations will be invited to speak to class about:

1.         Their experience as representative of their faith.
2.         Their experience with the settings of their institutions.
3.         Their experience with diversity.

Films:

1.     Crime & Punishment (5/ 45 minutes each).
2.     World’s apart (a four-part series on cross-cultural healthcare. 

Time for the guest speakers and the films will be incorporated to class days based on availability.

Hartford Seminary  77 Sherman Street  Hartford, CT  06105   860-509-9500  info@hartsem.edu