Academic Programs 
      

Doctor of Ministry Colleague Seminar I, Part II  (DM-711)
January Interession and Winter/Spring 2009


A continuation of D.Min. Colleague Seminar I, Part I. Required of first-year D.Min. students
.

 

Meeting Day, Time and Dates: 
Mondays from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Jan. 26, Feb. 9, March 2, March 30 and April 27




James Nieman

Professor of Practical Theology

Contact Information:
phone: 
(860) 509-9516
email: jnieman@hartsem.edu

 

 

Course Syllabus



Objectives

  1. To build upon the previous semester’s work in arguing appropriate claims based on sound evidence, turning now to larger interpretive approaches;
  2. To explore a general typology that is influential in organizational studies in order more accurately to understand one’s own congregation and community;
  3. To engage in a sustained reflection on our repertoire of leadership practices and their place within one’s own congregation and community;
  4. To learn effective strategies for teaching what we have learned, developing planned and evaluated educational events for the classroom; and
  5. To deepen skills for critical thinking and theological reflection that are essential in the D.Min. program, including the diverse collegial relationships that enhance that program.

Procedure
The course alternates between five class sessions (see “Schedule”) and the intervening periods for individual exploration by students of the readings and their interpretive value in their respective settings. The class sessions rely on group discussions to deepen and concretize the readings, and instructor presentations to introduce further fieldwork resources for studying congregations and communities. The intervening periods rely on engagement with the readings and, for those so assigned, the development of a teaching outline for the ensuing session that draws those readings into conversation with a past challenge from one’s ministry setting, showing the student’s emerging role as a teacher. A final paper provides an occasion to integrate work from the entire semester by linking a newly significant challenge from one’s ministry setting with insights from organizational and leadership studies that have been presented by various means during the course.

Schedule
All reading assignments are to be completed in advance of the class session for which they are assigned. All teaching outlines must be sent by e-mail to the instructor and the colleague respondent by the Friday immediately before the class session for which they are assigned. All teaching responses must be sent by e-mail to the instructor and the colleague teacher by the Friday immediately after the class session in which the teaching occurred.

26 January — 10:00am to 4:30pm

Reading: Bolman & Deal, pp. 1-40
Method: Online research

9 February — 10:00am to 4:30pm

Reading: Klein, pp. 1-146
Jinkins/Jinkins, pp. 1-97
Writing: Teaching outlines and responses
Method: Cognitive task analysis

2 March — 10:00am to 4:30pm

Reading: Klein, pp. 147-293
Jinkins/Jinkins, pp. 101-193
Writing: Teaching outlines and responses
Method: Narrative analysis

30 March — 10:00am to 4:30pm

Reading: Friedman, pp. 1-186
Cahalan, pp. 1-95
Writing: Teaching outlines and responses
Method: Positive deviance studies

27 April — 10:00am to 4:30pm

Reading: Friedman, pp. 187-251
Nye, pp. 1-145
Writing: Teaching outlines and responses
Method: Visual anthropology

Grades
Throughout this course, grades are reported on an HP / P / LP basis. These grades mean:
HP Exceptional in several or most ways; such work completes all tasks, is creative and even original in content, and displays mastery of expression.
P Adequate in all basic ways; parts of the task are slighted, the content has minor weaknesses, and expression is competent yet not consistently compelling.
LP Inadequate in some ways; does not address significant tasks, shows weak or erroneous content, and expression sometimes obstructs understanding.

Required reading
Six required texts will be the basis for our student-led class discussions throughout the semester, as well as being foundational for the final paper.

Lee G. Bolman and Terrence E. Deal, Reframing Organizations: Artistry, Choice, and Leadership, 3rd ed. (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2003), pp. 1-40 only 0787964271

Kathleen A. Cahalan, Projects That Matter: Successful Planning and Evaluation for Religious Organizations (Bethesda, Md.: The Alban Institute, 2003) 1566992761

Gary Klein, Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions (Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press, 1998) 0262611465

Edwin H. Friedman, A Failure of Nerve: Leadership in the Age of the Quick Fix (New York: Seabury Books, 2007) 159627042X

Michael Jinkins and Deborah Bradshaw Jinkins, The Character of Leadership: Political Realism and Public Virtue in Nonprofit Organizations (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998) 0787941204

Joseph S. Nye, Jr., The Powers to Lead (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008) 9780195335620

Class participation 25% of grade
Attendance at and active participation in every class session is expected of all students. Exceptions are only allowed if advance permission has been granted by the instructor, and only for unavoidable absences. In all cases, failure to be in attendance at more than one class session automatically precludes successful completion of the course. The participation portion of the grade includes showing an active familiarity with all assigned readings.

Teaching assignments 30% of grade
Each student will lead a one-hour teaching session that engages the assigned readings. Completion of this assignment includes both the submission of a teaching outline attentive to the assignment sheet for that task and the teaching session itself. Teaching outlines must be sent by e-mail to the instructor and the colleague respondent by the Friday immediately before the class session in which the teaching will occur. (2⁄3 of teaching grade)

In addition, each student will respond to a teaching session led by another colleague in the course. Completion of this assignment includes both the review of the teaching outline received in advance and constructive reflection on the teaching session itself. Teaching responses must be sent by e-mail to the instructor and the colleague teacher by the Friday immediately after the class session in which the teaching occurred. (1⁄3 of teaching grade)

Final paper 45% of grade
The final paper integrates the central insights and readings from the semester. This paper will present an actual challenge to the student’s congregation or ministry and then analyze this in relation to organizational theory and leadership strategies from the semester. Details for the final paper, including focus and format, will be provided at the 30 March class session. Final papers must be posted to the Blackboard course website by 25 May 2009.

Course extensions
Past experience has shown that timely completion of all assignments and the entire course is essential to successful completion of the overall D.Min. program. As a result, late writing assignments are strongly discouraged and course extensions are not permitted.

Hartford Seminary  77 Sherman Street  Hartford, CT  06105   860-509-9500  info@hartsem.edu