Academic Programs 
      

Islamic Mysticism and Muslim Devotional Life and Practice  (IS-638-4)        
Summer 2003

Sufism, which refers to the mystical tradition within Islam, is concerned with the inner or esoteric understanding and practice of Islam. This course will examine Sufi interpretations of the Qur'an and the life of the Prophet Muhammad, and follow the development of Sufi spiritual practice and religious/philosophical thought with attention given to selected Sufi writers. The revival of Sufism in contemporary Islam will be studied with examples from around the world, including the United States.


Meeting Day, Time and Dates: 
June 9 – 13, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Alwi Shihab
Senior Research Associate in Islamic Studies and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Republic of Indonesia

Contact Information:
phone: 
(860) 509-9500
email:  

Course Syllabus


Required Reading:

I)   BOOKS

1.  Annemarie Schimmel, Mystical Dimensions of Islam (University of North Carolina Press)    

  2.  Nirmal Singh, Exploring Sikh Spirituality.

  3.  M. Watt, The Faith and Practice of Ghazali.

 


II) ARTICLES

1)   Irfan Omar, “Khidr in the Islamic Tradition.” The Muslim World, volume 83(July-October 1993): 279-294;

2)  Emelie Olson, “The Use of  Religious Symbol Systems and Rituals  in Turkey: Women’s Activities at Saints’ Shrines.” The Muslim World, volume 84(July-October 1984):  202-216.

3)  Frances Trix, “’When Christians Became Dervishes: Affirming Albanian Muslim and Christian Unity through Dialogue’.” The Muslim World, volume 85(3-4) July-October 1995: 280-294.

4)  “Sufism, Creativity and Exile: An Interview with Seyyed Hossein Nasr.” Jusoor, 7/8, 1996, pp.  131-158. 

5)  Michel Chodkiewicz, The Spiritual Writings of Amir ‘Abd al-Kader (SUNY, 1995): 29-73.

6)  Martin Lings, Symbol and Archetype: A Study of the Meaning of Existence (Quinta Essentia, 1991): pp. 67-82.

7)  Sayyida Fatimah Yshrutiyyah, “Contemplation and Action: The Sufi Way.” In  Yusuf Ibish and Ileana Marculescu, eds., Contemplation and Action in World Religions (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1978).

COURSE OUTLINE

1) First Day:  Introduction: Development of Early Islamic Mysticism    

Reading: Schimmel, Mystical Dimensions of Islam, pp. 3-97
 


2) Second Day: Foundations and Key Terms in Sufism

Reading: Schimmel, Mystical Dimensions of Islam, pp. 98-227 


3) Third Day:  The Qur’an and Sufism  

Reading:

1)  Sayyida Fatimah Yshrutiyyah, “Contemplation and Action: The Sufi Way.” In  Yusuf Ibish and Ileana Marculescu, eds., Contemplation and Action in World Religions (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1978); 

2) Martin Lings, Symbol and Archetype: A Study of the Meaning of Existence (Quinta Essentia, 1991): pp. 67-82; and 

3) Michel Chodkiewicz, The Spiritual Writings of Amir ‘Abd al-Kader (SUNY, 1995): 29-73. 

 

4) Fourth Day: The ‘Green One’ in Islamic Spirituality and Modern Sufism

Reading:

1) Nirmal Singh, Exploring Sikh Spirituality. PLEASE NOTE THAT Mr. Singh will lecture to the class on this day between 9:00 AM and noon time;  

2) Schimmel, Mystical Dimensions of Islam, pp. 228-286; and 

3) Irfan Omar, “Khidr in the Islamic Tradition.” The Muslim World, volume 83 (July-October 1993): 279-294

5) Fifth Day: Contemporary Spirituality  

Reading:  

1) Emelie Olson, “The Use of  Religious Symbol Systems and Rituals  in Turkey: Women’s Activities at Saints’ Shrines.” The Muslim World, volume 84(July-October 1984):  202-216; 

2); Frances Trix, “’When Christians Became Dervishes: Affirming Albanian Muslim and Christian Unity through Dialogue’.” The Muslim World, volume 85(3-4) July-October 1995: 280-294; and 

3) “Sufism, Creativity and Exile: An Interview with Seyyed Hossein Nasr.” Jusoor, 7/8, 1996, pp.  131-158

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

1)  One class presentation; 
2)  Final Research Paper; 
3) 
One book review. Your book review copy is M. Watt, The Faith and Practice of al-Ghazali.
4)  Class participation in general.

 

Hartford Seminary  77 Sherman Street  Hartford, CT  06105   860-509-9500  info@hartsem.edu