Academic Programs 
      

United Church of Christ History, Theology and Polity Summer Institute   (HI-565)
Summer 2005

The Summer Institute is designed as a two-week experience primarily for those needing basic work in United Church of Christ history, theology and polity.  The Institute is also designed for those students who are graduating from seminaries where a UCC polity course is not offered, or who are pursuing an alternative route to ordination.  Sponsored by Andover Newton Theological School, Bangor Theological Seminary and Hartford Seminary, this year the Institute will be held at Hartford Seminary.  

For more information and a complete program brochure please contact Karen Rollins, Registrar at (860)509-9511 or through email at krollins@hartsem.edu. 

 

Meeting Day, Time and Dates: 
Week 1 – June 13 - 17; Week 2 – June 20 - 24; Monday - Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.


For more information, read the institute's brochure.

Hartford Seminary

13th Annual Summer Institute:  
United Church of Christ History, Theology and Polity

HI-565-I

June 13-17; June 20-24, 2005

9:00-2:30

Tentative Course Syllabus

Course Instructors:

Kent Siladi                                                                  Susan Townsley
56 Davis Drive                                                             143 Partrick Ave.
Guilford, Ct. 06437                                                       Norwalk, Ct  06851
Telephone:  203-453-0614                                             Telephone:  203-849-7739
Email:  kents@ctucc.org                                              Email:  susant@ctucc.org

Course Goals and Objective

            The curriculum builds on consensus goals and objectives that have been developed by the network of UCC History, Theology and Polity professors. 

This course will acquaint students with the following aspects of the United Church of Christ:

1.    the history of the four strands that merged to form the UCC;
2.    the contributions of the various “hidden” groups;
3.    the events, process, and people of the 1957 mergers;
4.    the organizational structure;
5.    the theology underpinning the history, structure and mission;
6.    the mission and work;
7.    the ecumenical relationships and involvements;
8.    the governance, order, and financial arrangements;
9.    the theology of ministry and leadership;
10.  the process of ordination, placement and standing;
11.  the understanding of pastoral ethics;
12.  the theology and practice of worship, sacraments and hymnody; and
13.   the future of the United Church of Christ.

Texts

            Gunnemann – The Shaping of the United Church of Christ

            UCC Book of Worship

            New Century Hymnal

            UCC Manual on Ministry

            Booklet of Handouts (provided)

WEEK ONE

June 13th:            WHO AND WHAT IS THE UCC? 

Readings:            Gunneman, Shaping of the UCC Chapter Five

June 14th            EUROPEAN ROOTS AND COLONIAL BEGINNINGS

Readings:         Gunneman, 6 and 7

                         Cambridge Platform, Burial Hill Declaration, Kansas City Statement

                         Heidelberg Catechism

June 15th            AMERICAN RELIGIOUS LIFE AND FRONTIER EXPANSION

Readings:            Gunneman, 7

                        Six Principles of the Christian Church

                        Evangelical Catechism

June 16th            HISTORY:  HIDDEN STORIES AND CONTEMPORARY DIVERSITY

Readings:        Optional Reading:  Hidden Histories in the United Church of Christ

June 17th            UCC STRUCTURES AND MISSION

Readings:        Gunneman, 1-4, 8 Basis of Union

                        Constitution and Bylaws of the UCC

                        Various Restructuring Documents (handout)

                        Summary Look at the UCC (handout)

WEEK TWO

June 20th            ECCLESIOLOGY AND THEOLOGY

Readings:        United Church of Christ Statement of Faith

                        “United Church of Christ Ecclesiology”  Steckel

                        Study Guide to UCC Ecclesiology

June 21nd            LEADERSHIP AND MINISTRY

Readings:        Manual on Ministry

                        Constitution and Bylaws of the UCC

                        Leadership Styles (handout)

June 22nd            WORSHIP AND NURTURE

Readings:        Book of Worship

                        New Century Hymnal

                        Inclusive Language Covenant

                        Articles on Baptism and Eucharist  Gunneman

June 23th            MISSION

Readings:            UCC Desk Calendar

                        UCC Statement of Mission

                        Handbook of Resolutions

                        MultiRacial/Multicultural Pronouncement

                        Open and Affirming Pronouncement

                        Directory of Missionary Personnel

June 24th            THE UCC – UNITED AND UNITING

Readings:            A Formula of Agreement

                        Building Unity

                        Ecumenical Partnership with the Disciples of Christ

                        “Contemporary Commitment and Catholic Substance”  Thomas

Guidelines for Discussion/Conversation

            This class will challenge us in many and varying ways.  Our aim is to create and maintain an atmosphere conducive to honest and thorough exploration, dialogue, analysis and critique.  The following guidelines are offered to foster such an environment for our discussions.

1.      We will listen to one another – patiently, carefully – assuming each one of us is always doing the best she or he can.  We will speak thoughtfully.  We will treat one another with respect.

2.      We will address our colleagues by name.

3.      We will speak in the first person.

4.      We will own our assumptions, our conclusions and their implications.  We will be open to another’s intellectual growth and change.

5.      We cannot be blamed for misinformation, which we have been taught and which we have absorbed from our society and culture, but we will be held accountable for repeating such misinformation after we have learned otherwise.

6.      We each have an obligation to actively combat stereotypes so we can eradicate the biases, which prevent us from envisioning the well being of us all.

(Adapted from a section developed by M. Shawn Copeland, Marquette University;  Katie Cannon, Temple University; Lynn Cannon, Memphis State University).

Hartford Seminary  77 Sherman Street  Hartford, CT  06105   860-509-9500  info@hartsem.edu